ROSENBERG SURVEY: CPA PARTNER INCOME BOUNCES UP

Roseland, N.J. -- Income per equity partner at the nation's CPA firms jumped 5.5 percent in 2012, climbing to $386,000, according to the recently released 2013 Rosenberg MAP Survey. The well-respected annual report, which is the result of a partnership between the Rosenberg Associates and the Growth Partnership, surveyed 390 firms of all sizes across the country. The IPP figure is the highest ever recorded in the survey, which also reported that firm revenues grew 5.4 percent in 2012. Just under a quarter of that was due to mergers, the report noted, and larger firms generally reported stronger growth rates than smaller ones.

The survey also includes a wealth of data on other aspects of firm management, from billing rates and personnel policies to partner compensation and gender mix, as well as a special report on e-mail marketing trends and statistics. It is available online at www.rosenbergsurvey.com/ for $450.

 

SANDY LESSONS GO UNLEARNED

New York City -- While almost half of the small businesses in the area hit by Superstorm Sandy expect to be hit by another natural disaster in the next year, only a fifth of them feel that they are prepared, according to a recent survey. In addition, more than two thirds of the hundred small-business owners and decision-makers surveyed said that they have not created a disaster plan, and nearly half haven't identified an alternative place to work if their offices are closed by a disaster.

The survey, by Wakefield Research for online backup provider Carbonite, was conducted on the anniversary of Sandy.

On the positive side, nearly 75 percent of respondents back up their data, but the majority (63 percent) are backing up on-site, to external hard drives and the like that reside in their offices.

"People are in denial," said Carbonite chairman and CEO David Friend. "Around 13 percent of our clients need to do a full restore every year, so you have about a one in eight chance" of getting hit - and it's not always natural disasters. Theft, office fires, broken water mains and simple hard drive failure can all create a business continuity problem.

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